Frogs, Toads, and Spiders in My Garden

I love frogs. I find their big eyes, bubble tipped fingers, and propensity for jumping on your face very charming. When I moved into my home last summer, I noticed a family of Cuban tree frogs living on our avocado tree. Every day, I’d look closely at the avocado tree and, more often than not, I’d find at least one of the little tree frogs. Then, when fall came rolling in, the frogs disappeared. Now, with the wet and rainy season upon us. we’re seeing the Cuban tree frog again! This time, the frogs are much bigger and enjoy climbing on our windows at night. We’ve spotted them twice, caught them, and brought them inside to show Dylan and Stella. I like to think they are the same family of frogs, returning to their favorite home in warmer weather.

Now, lets talk about toads. Toads, are big, warty, and look down right mean. When we first moved into our new home, we noticed toads right away. Big, scary toads hiding under the rocks, beneath the long patches of grass, in flower pots, just anywhere where they could stay wet. I warned my son about the toad’s defense of secreting poisonous liquid from it’s skin to poison predators so now, naturally, he’s terrified of them.

By the way, did you know that toads are actually frogs?! They’re just a different type of frog. I was researching toads and how to encourage toads in your garden (while keeping them far away from your pets and children) when I stumbled upon that little juicy tidbit.

IMG_9964

I’ve never seen so many types of spiders in one place as I’ve encountered in my garden. I see spiny orb weavers, wolf spiders, little orange spiders, these cool metallic spiders, really weird, sea star looking spiders, and more. I’m kind of fearfully fascinated by spiders. I like them, I enjoy watching as they spin their webs in the early evening hours, I always check out their webs to see what they’re having for dinner, but I don’t want to touch them or get too close.

DSC00001.JPG

 

DSC00013

 

Whatever I may feel about the above mentioned creatures, I know that seeing them in my garden means that I’m doing something right. Finding frogs, toads, and spiders in your back yard is a good sign that you have a thriving ecosystem. It means that there are plenty of spaces for these creatures to set up camp, there is a steady stream of food for them to eat, and that you have a good, healthy environment. The biggest benefit of having frogs, toads, and spiders in your garden is that they eat all sorts of bugs that would otherwise be eating your plants or biting you. When you practice organic gardening, it’s hard to find ways to keep the bugs off of your plants. Having frogs, toads, and spiders in your garden is actually the most natural pest control out there.

Now, what if you don’t see these guys in your garden and want to attract them?

From my experience, the best way to attract these creatures is to create a wild garden with many nooks and crevices for these creatures to use. Ever since we moved to our home last June, we’ve been working on our garden. When we first moved in, the yard was a flat piece of lawn. There were no plants…not even one. It was a blank canvas for us. So, we sat down with a sheet of paper and a pencil and drew what we imagined to be our dream garden and, little by little, we have been bringing that dream to life. Now, when we go outside and see so many beautifully healthy plants, so much complexity and so much life, we marvel at the natural beauty.

Another piece of advice that helps keep creatures in your garden is that you don’t manicure your yard too much. A wild garden is just what frogs, toads, and spiders are attracted to. They’ll have plenty of spaces to hide and plenty of food to eat. So, in our backyard, we let our porter weed grow out of control for a while, we leave long grass to shade toads for as long as my husband can stand it, we let our vines grow wild, and we have a wide variety of plants all around. I think it’s that simple…add several plants to your yard, create nooks for creatures to use, and let your yard grow a little wild, and the creatures will deem your space the perfect environment.

DIY – Sweet Potato Slips

I never knew that sweet potatoes came from slips. Slips, being the little shoots that grow off of a sweet potato, is the way to grow new sweet potatoes. I don’t know what I thought before…maybe there was some type of sweet potato seed? I mean, how did sweet potatoes come to be anyway? I’m sure there is a seed somewhere in that equation.  Anyway, when I decided to dedicate one of my garden boxes to the sweet potato, I researched and learned a lot. Creating slips is like a beautiful science experiment. When I started doing it on my own, I knew I wanted to share it on my blog because it’s so interesting and easy.

So, there are two ways to make slips: the first is to take one sweet potato, place two tooth picks near the top end of that sweet potato, and place the sweet potato in a mason jar that is about 1/3 filled with water. You keep it on your window sill and change out the water every few days. In a few weeks, when you see many medium-sized leaves on your slips, you can just pick them off and plant them.

Here is a picture of the one I have on my windowsill. This was taken about a week ago…

IMG_0167

And here is that same sweet potato today…

IMG_0170

I honestly think it looks so pretty that I just might keep it there as a decorative piece.

The next way (and much easier way) is to take one sweet potato and put it in the soil. I have an earth box filled with soil that I placed it in. This works the same as the previous way, just pick the slips off when they look sturdy enough and plant them. For sure, this way is the faster route to growing sweet potato slips. The potato thrives off of the nutrients in the soil as well as the warmth of the sunlight.

Here is a picture of a sweet potato that I planted directly in my garden bed.

IMG_0179

I actually had already pulled slips off of that sweet potato and planted them in the garden bed. That’s how much faster it is to create slips through this method.

IMG_0177

So, that’s all it takes to make sweet potato slips. It’s that easy. And, you know what else?   The sweet potato is one of the few plants that is recommended to be started from February to June. It’s the novice gardener’s dream ❤